Rashmi Hospital

Centre for Minimally Invasive Surgery & Maternity

190, Double Road, Indiranagar Bangalore 38

Tel: 25253311, 25251573, 25251139, 25200447

For Maternity, Gynaecology & ENT: 9880108844/9980015424

Keyhole surgeries performed

E-Mail: info@rashmihospital.com

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All your paediatric questions answered

All the information in this section has been provided by:

Dr Sanjay J Rao [Consultant Paediatrician]

Child Care Clinic

2013 100Ft Rd Indiranagar Bangalore 560008 Tel: 91 80 5767 8757/2526 7085

Bathing your baby
Everything about fever
Breastfeeding in public
Successful breastfeeding
   

 Everything you need to know about FEVER….. as a  Parent

 

What is a fever?

·        Normal body temperature is 98.6°F,but children and infants can have a slightly higher normal temperature. Temperature over 100°F (37.8°C) represents fever. A fever is considered a ‘high fever’ when the temperature is above 104°F (40°C)

·        Remember: Fever is beneficial to your child. It helps fight infections. 

How should you measure your baby’s temperature?

      There are 3 ways you can measure the temperature of your baby

  1. ·        Mercury thermometer: Keep the thermometer snugly in your baby’s underarm for 1 minute, after wiping the area with a dry cloth.

  2. ·        DO NOT add 1°F to the reading

  3. ·        Fever Strip:  Wipe the forehead of your baby with a dry cloth and apply the strip.

  4. ·        Ear Thermometer:  Place snugly in the ear and depress activation button for 1 second. 

What causes a fever?

·        Fever can be the result of too much clothing, overexertion or dehydration.  It can also be a sign of infection or a reaction to certain immunizations

·        Many high fevers are caused by infections that are not serious .If your child is alert and active and playing— don’t worry. 

Is there any permanent damage when a child runs a very high fever and has convulsions?

·        Febrile convulsions are common.2 %   to 4 % of all children have one or more episodes by the age of seven.

·        They are not associated with damage to the nervous system.

·        Children ‘outgrow’ febrile convulsions by the age of 5 – 7 years.

What should you do when your child has a fever?

·        Encourage your child to drink extra fluids like coconut water, apple juice, weak tea with sugar, etc. Body fluids are lost during fevers because of sweating.

·        Clothing should be kept to a minimum because most heat is lost through the skin. Do not bundle up your child.

·        Medication: Give the correct dosage for your child’s age. Repeated dosages of the drugs may be necessary. Discuss the medication with your child’s pediatrician in advance during a visit to his clinic.

·        Sponging : Sponge immediately in heat stroke, febrile convulsions and fever over 105°F

  1. Sponging can help if fever is very high in spite of medications

  2. Sponge your child with lukewarm water. Do not use ice/ ice water for sponging.

  3. Sit your child in 2 inches of water and keep wetting the skin surface.

  4. If your child shivers, stop sponging temporarily.

When should you call your doctor?

·        Fever present more than 48 hours.

·        Fever over 104°F (40° C) which does not subside or returns after medication.

·        Fever plus earache or other localized pain ( i.e. abdomen )

·        Fever plus urinary symptoms (such as pain with urination or lack of urination).

·        Fever plus persistent vomiting or diarrhea, especially in an infant.

·        Fever plus stiff neck.

·        If your child appears to be extremely sick, is upset and inconsolable, cries when touched or moved or is difficult to wake up the child.

·        Fever in an infant less than 3 months of age.

·        When in doubt about whether to call, go ahead and call.